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Caverhill History 2017-11-06T10:21:57+00:00

Our History

Caverhill Lodge offers a truly Canadian fly fishing lodge vacation experience in a historical setting. Our hunting and fishing camp was established in 1947 by D.K. Ellis. In the early years, the lodge’s clients were a rugged breed of Americans seeking to explore the interior of British Columbia.

Groups would arrive by horse back or float plane and stay for two weeks or more. Cabins had canvas walls and tin stoves. Meals were prepared in the cook shack and featured good home cooking however fresh produce would have been a rarity. Often guests built rafts or carried wooden boats more than a mile to explore the hot new fishing territory. No one fished before camp chores were done. Chopping wood and carrying water for the cook were on the top of the list.

Fishermen from around the world seeking new frontier

Even in 1947 Kamloops Rainbow Trout were making a name for themselves and fly fishermen from around the world were seeking out this new frontier. The area was featured in a 1958 National Geographic article.

In 1989 Marlene and Larry Loney, native British Columbians, took over the lodge. They changed the name of the lodge but maintained the wilderness traditions that have enriched the lives of all the guests who have visited over the years. Many of the lodges first clients continue to visit. These guests were first introduced to a BC fishing trip as children. They are now returning with their children to continue a family tradition.

The lodge has been continually upgraded to reflect the high standard of service now offered. Although times have changed, there is still an outhouse available for anyone feeling nostalgic!

Thanks for the great meals also. I kept saying to myself “I haven’t been so stuffed, so consistently day after day, since I was 10 or 12 years old.”
Chris Kelling
We are very lucky to have discovered you.
Spokane, Washington
Repetition can be the sincerest form of flattery. Twelve times in just six years.
Vancouver, British Columbia